Rubus idaeus (Female Reproductive)

Twas only to hear the yowling sing,

And pu’ the craw flower round the spring,

The scarlet herb and the hindberrie,

And the nutmeat hang frae the hazel tree – excerpted from Grieve’s ‘A Modern Herbal’ p. 671

Botanical name Rubus idaeus
Common name (s) Raspberry leaf, hindberry, raspbis, bramble of Mount Ida 6
Family Rosaceae
Parts used Leaf, fruit 7
Habitat Native to Europe & naturalized throughout the world, sometimes as troublesome weeds 9

Soil: moist, streambanks; pH 4 – 6; full sun 9

Active Constituents ·      Flavonoids (up to 5%) – derivatives of kaempferol, quercetin 1, and rutin 4

·      Polyphenols (up to 10% 1) – gallotannins & ellegitannins (2.06 – 6.89% 1) 2, sanguine H-6 11, procyanidin B 7

·      Vitamin C 9

·      Organic acids – pectin, citric and malic acids 6

·      Fruit sugar 7

Qualities Cool, dry, pleasantly aromatic, slight bitterness 8
Actions Antidiarrheal 2, anti-inflammatory 4, antispasmodic 5, astringent 2, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic 5, emmenagogue 7, hemostat, laxative (fruit), myostimulant 5, nervine (relaxant) 7, parturifacient, partus preparator 2, spasmolytic (uterine) 3, stimulant 5, uterotonic 7, uterorelaxant 5, vulnerary 6
Indications Endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain 3, childbirth, abnormal bleeding from uterus/stomach/bowels, mouth ulcers, diarrhea (esp.  children 7), cholera, dysentery, stomatitis, hemorrhage, prolapsed uterus 2, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, styes 11, burns, wounds, stomach complaints (esp. children) 6, bleeding gums, laryngitis 7, diabetes, boils, cough, cramping, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, blisters, heartburn, lethargy, measles, hemorrhoids, morning sickness, warts, gravel (urinary), influenza 5

Topical: tonsillitis, conjunctivitis, sore throat (see preparations) 2

Contraindications Constipation, malnutrition 10
Cautions Long-term use should be avoided due to tannin content which may result in irritation of the gastrointestinal tract 10

Use with caution when gastrointestinal tract is inflamed or ulcerated 10

Take away from meals as absorption of iron, magnesium and calcium may be impaired 4

Preparations & Dosage Dose per day

4.5 – 14ml of 1:2 LE 2

12 – 24ml of 1:1 LE 10

Dose per week

30 – 100ml of 1:2 LE 2

Infusion – 12 – 24g/day of dried leaf 10 (used as partum preparator)

Tincture – 2 – 4ml of 1:5 in 40% alcohol tds 7

Decoction for eyebaths

Gargle for sore throats 2

Interactions Take separately from from oral thiamine, metal ion supplements or alkaloid-containing medications 10
Combinations w/ powdered bark of Ulmus rubra in poultice form for wounds, burns and scalds 6

References

1 Barnes, J., Anderson, L., & Phillipson, J. (2007). Herbal Medicines 3rd ed. London, UK: Pharmaceutical Press

2 Bone, K. (2003). A Clinical Guide to Blending Liquid Herbs: Herbal Formulations for the Individual Patient. Missouri, USA: Churchill Livingstone.

3 Bone, K,. & Mills, S. (2013). Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy: Modern Herbal Medicine 2nd ed. China: Churchill Livingstone.

4 Braun, L., & Cohen, M. (2007). Herbs & Natural Supplements: An Evidence-Based Guide 2nd ed. Australia: Elsevier.

5 Duke, A. J., Bogenschutz-Godwin, M., DuCellier, J., & Duke, K. P. (2002). Handbook of Medicinal Herbs 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

6 Grieve, M. (1974). A Modern Herbal. Norfolk, UK: Lowe & Brydone LTD.

7 Hoffman, D. (2003). Medical Herbalism: the Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, USA: Healing Arts Press.

8 Holmes, P. (1993) The Energetics of Western Herbs; A Materia Medica Integrating

Western and Chinese Herbal Therapeutics, Vol 1 & 2. Snow Lotus: Boulder, Colo.

9 Keville, K. (1994). The Illustrated Herb Encyclopedia: A Complete Culinary, Cosmetic, Medicinal & Ornamental Guide to Herbs. East Roseville, NSW: Simon & Schuster.

10 Mills, S., & Bone, K. (2005). The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety. USA: Churchill Livingstone

11 Mills, S. (1991). Out of Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. London, England: Viking Arkana.

Müeller, L., & Schmidt, C. F. (2014). Rubus idaeus [Image]. Retrieved from http://plantcurator.com/medicinal-plants-german/

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